Mental Health: What is Oppositional Defiant Disorder?

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In a previous article, we told you about the newest mental health disorder, binge eating disorder, which was officially listed in the latest edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), or DSM-5.

And if you look at what this “condition” is, then chances are that almost everyone on this planet is suffering from it.

If you’ve lately been enjoying more food than normal ? like eating a whole tub of ice cream while watching a film ? or if you’ve been “uncomfortably full” several times a month, voila! Chances are you have “binge eating disorder” or BED.

Standing defiant

Now, as far as mental health disorders go, you might think that Binge-Eating Disorder takes the cake… Literally… but I think there’s another one that might top it.

And if you ask me, just like binge eating disorder, this one is not a real mental health disorder. But what it almost certainly is, is a shining example of how far Big Pharma will go to get our children on the drug treadmill as early as possible.

The condition is called “oppositional defiant disorder” or ODD. Oppositional defiant disorder is a considered a “co-existing disorder” that children are being diagnosed with who also suffer (or are likely to develop) attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). ODD first became an “official” ailment in the early ’80s.

If you want a mental picture of its symptoms, well, just visualize any small child, especially one in the “terrible twos.”

A child with ODD is said to have “frequent outbursts,” a “tendency to argue” and “ignore requests,” and my favourite, “engage in intentionally annoying behaviour.”

So if you see (and hear) a toddler having a meltdown in the supermarket, well, that is a textbook case of ODD.

Now, the good news is that your child will outgrow this terrible condition by the time they turn eight (something most mums could have told all these “experts”).

But the bad news is that the treatment for ODD can involve one of the worst and most addictive drugs out there. One called Vyvanse.

That may have a familiar ring to you, because literally months after the DSM-5 ? the diagnostic “bible” used by the mental health industry across the globe ? was published, the American Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Elvanse for binge eating disorder. And Elvanse is a knock-off of the drug Vyvanse.

Vyvanse is an amphetamine that could become highly addictive after only a short time. Trying to get off the drug could cause some real side effects, such as personality changes, an increased heart rate, panic attacks and suicidal thoughts…

Vyvanse is a notorious and potentially deadly drug, which has been linked to suicides in adults and children, including children as young as seven. It reportedly can unleash a sort of psychological hell, with potential side effects ranging from depression to outright panic.

In other words, real mental (and physical) disorders.

So, if you hear the words BED, ODD, Vyvanse or Elvanse from your doctor, run for the hills, because not only has your doctor bought into two fake mental health conditions, but he or she has also fallen for Big Pharma’s heavy-handed drug-intensive style of medicine.

On a different note:

Recently, we asked you to participate in a survey to find out what your thoughts are on the future of the NHS after Brexit. The response we got from all our readers was extremely insightful and it is clear that the state of the NHS is a topic very close to everyone’s hearts.

As a result, myself and the Managing Editor of the Journal of Natural Health Solutions, Rachael Linkie, have decided to host a webinar towards the end of August during which we will discuss some of your concerns about the future of the NHS.

To submit your questions and comments for this webinar please contact us at editors@agorahealth.co.uk using the subject line ‘Brexit Webinar’


Disclaimer: Bear in mind the material contained in this article is provided for information purposes only. We are not addressing anyone’s personal situation. Please consult with your own physician before acting on any recommendations contained herein.

Sources:

“What is oppositional defiant disorder?” Royce Flippin, Additude, additudemag.com

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  • It will be interesting to know how many people actually suffer with BED and ODD? I suspect, if the drugs given to these people don’t sell that well, diagnosis for the condition will increase.

    • ODD… what a silly name for something that is not even real. Surely Big Pharma must laugh at the people who actually buy into these invented diseases.

  • Isn’t Vyvanse or Elvanse a drug that is given to menopausal women? Now it’s dished outs to odd kids? Crazy stuff, if you ask ,me.

  • I was odd when I was in school. Back then, it was called being an individual. Thank heavens I was not given a powerful drug to dumb me down.

  • There are people with real mental health issues and over-eating might just be a symptom of what they are struggling with on a deeper level. I’m not suggesting that these people must take another drug to treat the symptom, but for some people overeating is a real problem. Your article might be insensitive to these people.

  • I feel “uncomfortably full” several times a week, let alone a month. But I have leaky gut and IBS, not BED. For goodness sake where will we go next with behaviour that doesn’t fit the “normal” bill? BTW, my nutritionist suggested regular probiotic supplements to help with my symptoms and I believe they also help with mental health – probably not as powerful and addictive as the drug you wrote about, but then that’s a good thing.

  • I am Bipolar 2 (mild bipolar) and it took me years to get an accurate diagnosis because the guidelines for this mental condition keep changing. This leaves me to think that mental health is not an exact science, which of course leaves a window of opportunity for Big Pharma to exploit patients with “invented” mental health conditions like ODD. I mean seriously, shouldn’t it be called KID (or just being a stroppy child!). Drugs won’t help, discipline and a good scolding every now and then might do the trick though.

  • Binge Eating Disorder? Seriously? I think I suffer with this every weekend. It’s just ridiculous how every little behaviour that doesn’t fit the norm is labelled as a mental health disorder.

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