Boost your mind and memory with cherry juice

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Where I grew up in South Africa cherries were expensive and in a very big way considered “exotic” fruit. And this is one of the many things I love about living in the UK – over here people talk about a “cherry season” and cherry juice is not as scarce as chicken milk.

Apart from its delicious taste, according to a new study, drinking cherry juice can help put the brakes on age-related memory loss and even help slow down the development of dementia.

Refresh your memory

In this latest study, published in the European Journal of Nutrition, researchers found that the nutrients that give cherries their deep, dark red colour, called anthocyanins, improved memory and cognition in older adults with mild-to-moderate dementia.

The researchers randomly gave participants either cherry juice or red juice that didn’t contain anthocyanins as a control.

At the end of the study, the cherry juice group was able to produce the right words more quickly (a skill we call “verbal fluency”), compared to the control group.

They also significantly improved both their short- AND long-term memories, compared to controls.

In addition, the cherry juice group also had significant reductions in their systolic blood pressure…

So, if you’re beginning to struggle to hold onto your memories and those senior moments are beginning to happen a bit too often, try adding cherry juice to your diet for a delicious brain “pick-me-up”.

Tart cherries are also a great “pick” for your health in a number of other ways.

They’re high in vitamin A, potassium, and fibre, as well as phenolic acids, which can reduce stiffness in your arteries that paves the way for heart disease.

Plus, cherries’ anti-inflammatory properties help fight gout flare-ups, and the melatonin they contain can help you get a good night’s sleep.

You can find cherry juice at your local health food store. Just make sure to get the “tart” kind so you don’t overload on added sugar.



Disclaimer: Bear in mind the material contained in this article is provided for information purposes only. We are not addressing anyone’s personal situation. Please consult with your own physician before acting on any recommendations contained herein.

Sources:

Researchers from University of Wollongong Report New Studies and Findings in the Area of Dementia, lifeextension.com/News/LefDailyNews?NewsID=26483&Section=AGING

Consumption of anthocyanin-rich cherry juice for 12 weeks improves memory and cognition in older adults with mild-to-moderate dementia, link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00394-015-1083-y

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