Lack Of Sleep Linked To Memory Loss

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Let’s face it, growing older has many blessings — seeing your grandchildren grow up, enjoying your retirement and having far fewer stresses once you leave the daily grind of the rat race.

But it also has its downside… blood sugar dips, aching joints, frequent trips to the bathroom, memory loss and an increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease.

40 winks… or a bit more

By now you know how important getting enough sleep is to your overall health… and it turns out that getting enough shut-eye may just protect your precious memories from fading away.

According to recent research, the key to keeping your mind sharp well into your old age could be as simple as getting a good night’s sleep.

Researchers at Oregon Health & Science University found that sleepless nights may be a contributing factor to the onset of Alzheimer’s or dementia.

You see, sleep is a brain detoxifier and it’s the time during which dangerous and potentially life-threatening toxins are flushed out of your brain… the very same toxins that are linked to Alzheimer’s, dementia, and even stroke.

Regular lack of sleep can lead to these toxins building up in the corners of your mind so much that eventually, they can’t be swept out… blocking and destroying your precious memories.

So, if you want to hold onto a lifetime of beautiful memories, here are some simple tips to help ensure a restful night’s sleep, every night:

  • Switch off early: Turn off all devices, including your television, computer, and smartphone an hour before hitting the mattress. And see to it that these are kept in a different room so you’re not tempted to use them… just one more time.
  • Soak before you sleep: Take a long relaxing warm soak in the bath before bedtime. Epsom salt can help relax you and ease those aching muscles.
  • Set your alarm… for bedtime: Go to bed at the same time each night. Sticking to the same routine trains your body to begin shutting down at the same time each night and get up at the same time each morning.


Disclaimer: Bear in mind the material contained in this article is provided for information purposes only. We are not addressing anyone’s personal situation. Please consult with your own physician before acting on any recommendations contained herein.

Sources:

POOR SLEEP MAY BE LINKED TO ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE, published online, Fisher Center for Alzheimer’s Disease Research Foundation, alzinfo.org

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